Nov. 6 general election races finalized as voters pick their parties’ candidates

Pousosa challenges Stenger in November for council seat

Cloria Brown

Cloria Brown

By Staff Report

Voters last week selected their parties’ candidates for the Nov. 6 general election for state and federal offices.

Rep. Cloria Brown prevailed over challenger Tim Hotop in the Republican primary for the 94th District Missouri House seat, according to unofficial results.

Brown garnered 2,174 votes — 75.46 percent — while Hotop received 707 votes — 24.54 percent.

Brown, who currently represents District 85, now will face Democrat Vicki Lorenz Englund, a former state representative and current Lindbergh Board of Education member, in the general election for the newly redrawn 94th District.

Brown was elected to the Missouri House two years ago when she defeated Englund, who was unopposed in the Aug. 7 primary.

Bob Burns defeated Joe Montecillo in the Democratic primary for the Missouri House District 93, according to unofficial results.

Burns received 1,367 votes — 59 percent — while Montecillo garnered 949 votes — 41 percent.

Burns will square off against Republican Tony Leech in the general election. Leech was unopposed in the primary.

Burns served as an alderman from 1982 to 1984 for the city of St. George, which since has disincorporated, and on the Affton Board of Education from 1984 to 1996.

U.S. Rep. Todd Akin prevailed over seven other candidates last week to capture the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate seat up for election in November.

Akin and Libertarian candidate Jonathan Dine, who was unopposed last week, will square off against Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill, who also was unopposed last week, in the general election.

Among the candidates Akin bested in the primary were businessman John Brunner and former Missouri Treasurer Sarah Steelman.

Akin received 217,404 votes — 36 percent, while Brunner garnered 180,788 — 30 percent — and Steelman tallied 176,127 votes — 29.2 percent, according to unofficial results.

Akin first was elected to the Missouri House in 1988 and served there until he was elected in November 2000 to the U.S. House, where he has served since 2001.

Incumbent U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay prevailed over U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan and newcomer Candice Britton last week in the Democratic primary for the District 1 congressional seat.

As a result of redistricting, Carnahan’s 3rd District was dismantled and he unsuccessfully challenged Clay.

Clay received 57,672 votes — 63.3 percent — while Carnahan tallied 30,911 votes — 33.9 percent — and Britton garnered 2,566 votes — 2.8 percent, according to unofficial results.

Clay now will face Republican Robyn Hamlin and Libertarian Robb E. Cunningham in the November election.

Hamlin defeated Martin D. Baker in last week’s primary to capture her party’s nomination.

Hamlin received 9,727 votes — 57.9 percent — while Baker tallied 7,076 votes — 42.1 percent, according to unofficial results.

Ann Wagner defeated three other candidates in last week’s Republican primary for the 2nd District congressional seat, while Glenn Koenen narrowly prevailed over three other candidates in the Democratic primary for the seat being vacated by Akin.

Wagner, Koenen, Libertarian candidate Bill Slantz and Constitution Party candidate Anatol Zorikova will vie for the seat in the general election.

In the Republican primary, Wagner received 53,574 votes — 65.8 percent, according to unofficial results. Randy Jotte garnered 18,644 votes — 22.9 percent — John Morris tallied 6,040 votes — 7.4 percent — and James O. Baker received 3,185 votes — 3.9 percent.

In the Democratic primary, Koenen garnered 7,893 votes — 28.4 percent. George “Boots” Weber tallied 7,545 votes — 27.1 percent — Harold Whitfield received 7,844 votes — 28.2 percent — and Marshall Works garnered 4,531 votes — 16.3 percent.

Republican Tony Pousosa of Green Park will challenge Democratic incumbent Steve Stenger for the 6th District County Council seat in the general election.

Both were unopposed in last week’s primary.

Pousosa, who serves as a Ward 1 alderman for the city of Green Park, received 11,213 votes, while Stenger, who was elected to the County Council in 2008, tallied 6,993 votes.

Township committeewomen and committeemen were elected in last week’s primary election.

Two townships — Gravois and Lemay — had contested committeewomen and committeemen races.

In

, incumbent Republican Committeewoman Katy Forand was defeated by Jennifer Bird.

Bird received 1,700 votes — 53.31 percent — while Forand tallied 1,479 votes — 46.38 percent, according to unofficial results.

Gravois Township incumbent Republican Committeeman John Winston beat back a challenge from David Wissler.

Winston garnered 1,676 votes — 54.19 percent, while Wissler received 1,396 votes — 45.13 percent, according to unofficial results.

In

, Teresa Douglas narrowly defeated Jacqueline Simon for the Republican committeewoman post.

Douglas received 989 votes — 51.59 percent — while Simon tallied 914 votes — 47.68 percent, according to unofficial results.

Alan Leaderbrand was elected Lemay Township Republican committeeman, besting Nathan Brekel and Randy Howard in last week’s election.

Leaderbrand received 788 votes — 41.04 percent, according to unofficial results. Brekel tallied 642 votes — 33.44 percent — while Howard garnered 469 votes — 24.43 percent.

The following township races were uncontested last week:

— Democrats Marilyn Beck and Frank Lydon and Republicans Pousosa and Joann Raisch were elected.

— Incumbent Michael Vogt, a former state representative, was re-elected Democratic committeeman. No candidate filed for Democratic committeewoman.

— Democrat Joan Barry was elected committeewoman, while incumbent Democrat Earl Blase and incumbent Republicans Celeste Witzel and Kurt Witzel were re-elected.

— Republican incumbent John Judd was re-elected, as was Democratic incumbent Jane Koeller. Anita Zolman was elected Republican comitteewoman and Jim Barrett was elected Democratic committeeman.

Township committeewomen and committeemen serve four-year terms.