Technology should be able to solve some of society’s biggest issues

Letters+to+the+editor

Letters to the Editor

To the editor:

Some of the wide range of letters you’ve printed recently have been very thought-provoking. But most didn’t offer any real answers … or solutions.

In a Sept. 26 letter, Ed Rohde criticized Ms. Georgeanne Gass because her Aug. 1 letter on abortion lacked any “reasonable alternative solutions.”

Several decades ago I suggested in letters to both St. Louis daily papers — the conservative Globe-Democrat and the liberal Post-Dispatch — that medical technology might be able, if given the opportunity, to get much closer to solving the abortion issue than more “political-religious” arguments by developing an artificial womb so unwanted fetuses could be “transplanted” until they were viable and then put up for adoption.

Progress was made; some prominent doctors and scientists were optimistic. But then some politician(s) inserted a short phrase into some regulation that dampened or extinguished that possibility.

In another Sept. 26 letter, Mr. Bill Westmeyer suggested that term limits or limits on donor contributions would help solve our political problems. But who gets elected or defeated is not nearly as important as what bills get proposed… and then passed …or defeated.

Suppose you owned a big business, and one day while touring your factory or office you decided to change the color of some item or the style of lettering on some document.

Couldn’t you just tell your employee at the machine or desk to make your change without having to process your request down through four or five levels of management that might take two or four or six years?

Given our current state of technology and communications, all registered voters could have some controlled ways to modify most quantitative decisions and override some yes-or-no decisions.

David Malan
Oakville