Guyer’s oversight ensures success of Lindbergh projects

‘Call the Tune’ by Mike Anthony

By Mike Anthony

Lindbergh Schools’ sixth elementary school, Dressel, officially opens to students today — Thursday, Aug. 17 — as the new school year begins.

What a magnificent building. The state-of-the-art elementary school features individual classroom wings for each grade level; a 21st-century modern, student-centered library; two STEM — Science, Technology, Engineering and Math — classrooms to enhance student learning and exploration; energy-efficient LED lighting, mechanical system and light-reflecting roof surface to reduce cooling costs; and a competition-size gym.

Construction of the nearly $22 million, 99,116-square-foot school at 10911 Tesson Ferry Road is the latest in a series of building and renovation projects that Lindbergh has embarked upon over the past 20 years or so.

Those projects, which have been funded by a series of bond issues from 1995 to 2014, include numerous additions to schools throughout the district, a natatorium with a swimming pool and a multipurpose room at Lindbergh High School, the building of two early childhood education buildings, construction of Concord Elementary School and the completion of Dressel Elementary.

Lindbergh has a long history of ensuring construction and renovation projects come in on time and on budget. Certainly, the success of all of these projects is due to a vast number of experts, including architects, engineers, contractors and so forth.

But for more than 20 years, one person has been at the forefront of all of Lindbergh’s projects — Executive Director of Planning and Development Karl Guyer.

Guyer’s vision, expertise and oversight are the primary reasons why Lindbergh’s construction and renovation projects are so flawlessly completed — unlike other local school districts that have experienced construction delays and millions of dollars of cost overruns on projects.

Superintendent Jim Simpson told the Call that he believes that “Karl is a huge asset to Lindbergh.”

But Simpson noted that Guyer may face the biggest challenge of his Lindbergh career, as the buildings that comprise Lindbergh High School are reaching the end of their lifespan.

“His biggest challenge may be in front of him in terms of LHS, which would dwarf any other construction program that Lindbergh has ever had,” Simpson said.

Given his successful track record at Lindbergh, we believe Guyer should be more than up to the challenge.