Reader plans to vote a ‘resounding no’ on Crestwood charter amendments

To the editor:

All elections are important.

But the Nov. 7 ballot is especially compelling due to the serious nature of ballot issues. Issues which challenge and expose our moral, ethical and religious values. Challenges which press us to look inward to our core values for answers.

The issues are contentious; the outcome such that we must think on both the short- and long-term consequences.

Ads, fliers, spots, a sometime intrusion into our soul searching can be a repetitive nuisance. Candidates taking the low road fail to inspire those who trust the integrity of their personal judgment. Electioneering this time around seems to illustrate there are few running for office who should even be allowed in a governing position unless attired in tar and feathers.

However, democracy prevails, and our customs and practices, devilish as they can be, are what we have adopted as our “way.” In my new-found maturity, this time, I have read and studied and charged the responsibility of my vote fully to myself. I have made my decisions on the tobacco, minimum wage, veterans, school and stem-cell issues and I know which candidate for senator will receive my vote.

Newspapers have helped me immensely; debates have left me cold. The accelerated pace of mud slinging has insulted both the dignity of the issues and the offices and my state of Missouri.

Adding to the intensity of Nov. 7 are ballot issues affecting my city of Crestwood, which includes amendments intended to alter my city’s charter. My decision on this vote will be a resounding “no.” My respect for the dedication of the original and neutral Charter Commission, authors of our first charter 11 years ago, remains intact. They clearly knew what they were doing and did it right the first time.

The proposed new and abridged version has done no more than muddle an efficient body of work with excess verbiage, politically inspired and meant to confuse. Our present charter is a solid and efficient instrument of governance. When and if we need to change our charter, it must be for a sound reason. Now is just not that time. I absolutely support term limits; mayors should break ties.

We already have the means to recall; and when I think of a citizen referendum, I want a very impressive percentage of resident signatures, not a meaningless count.

Carol Casey

Crestwood